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Date / Heure
Date(s) - 10/03/2016
12 h 30 min - 14 h 30 min

Emplacement
HEC Montréal

SamiaChreimRéduit

Samia Chreim
Professeure titulaire
École de gestion Telfer
Université d’Ottawa

Salle: Cogeco (1er étage, section bleue)

Conférence donnée en anglais
Presentation in English

Apportez votre lunch, café et jus seront servis!

Résumé/Abstract
In this study, we examine multi-level identity work in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams. ACT teams provide services to individuals with serious and persistent mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. In their work, ACT teams and their members are confronted with multiple institutional tensions. They operate in a highly institutionalized environment where they need to adhere to ACT Standards set out by health authorities, yet literature indicates that identity work is engaged in part to construct distinctiveness. In addition, ACT teams and their members face the stigma of working with a marginalized population, while internally valuing the work they perform. At the individual level, ACT employees are incumbents of contradictory yet highly institutionalized roles. The purpose of our study is to understand how ACT teams and individuals construct their identities as they deal with the different tensions. We also explore how identity work at the individual level shapes and is shaped by identity work undertaken at the team level. We ask the following research questions: How is identity work conducted at the individual and group levels in a context characterized by institutional tensions? How does work at these two levels interact and how is it influenced by the institutional environment?

Co-auteurs: Trish Reay, Mariline Comeau-Vallée, Ann Langley, Jo-Louise Huq